Recipe for (Measuring) Success | npENGAGE

Recipe for (Measuring) Success

By on Sep 22, 2010 | NONPROFIT-FUNDRAISING

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Recipe for (Measuring) Success

Event season is in full swing which means three things to me… reports, reports, reports.  If you’ve got an event (or many events) taking place this fall, and are using an online fundraising tool like TeamRaiser, you are probably up to your elbows in reports as well.  Today, I’d like to share with you my favorite event report, in the hopes that it might save you some time and provide some insight into what you should be tracking and how to track it.

Creating a report is like creating a recipe – you have to think about what you want to get out of it before you know what to put into it.  With fundraising events, you want to know how many people are participating, whether they are fundraising, and how much so you can adjust your communication and marketing strategies accordingly.  Here is my recipe to achieve just that:

Fundraising Activity Progress Report
To see how many participants are registered and actively fundraising online, begin by creating a new report that includes each participant line by line,* and pull the following pieces of data for each:

(Ingredients):

  • Name + any biological or address info you’d like to track
  • Team Name
  • Is Team Captain
  • Registration Date
  • Registration Fees Paid
  • Additional Gift (at time of registration) Amount
  • Number of Emails Sent from Participant Center
  • Online Dollars Raised
  • Number of Online Gifts
  • Total Dollars Raised
  • Number of Total Gifts

*In Convio, this is the Report Writer TeamRaiser Registration or Cross-Event Registration report.

(Instructions):
Save your report, and add the appropriate filters so you narrow the results to the event and participants you’re looking for.  Then run the report and downloaded it to a .csv file and save it in excel.

Next, you’ll want to use this report to analyze any number of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), including:

  • Percent of participants who are fundraising online: Sort your file by the “Online Amount Raised” column, largest to smallest.  Note the number of people with dollar amounts greater than zero, and divide that number by the total number of participants.  Multiply by 100 and you have your percentage of fundraisers.
  • Average amount raised per fundraiser: Sort your file by the “Online Amount Raised” column, largest to smallest. After the last participant with a dollar amount greater than zero, insert a new row.  Select the cell below the last participant’s online amount raised, and use the Function (fx) feature to calculate the average amount raised.
  • Average e-mails sent per fundraiser: Sort your file by the “Emails Sent” column, largest to smallest. After the last participant with a number of emails that is greater than zero, insert a new row.  Select the cell below the last participant’s number of emails sent, and use the Function (fx) feature to calculate the average number of emails sent.
  • Average online donation amount: Scroll to the bottom of the spreadsheet and sum up two columns – online amount raised and number of online gifts.  Divide the sum of online amount raised by the sum of number of gifts.
  • Percent of participants who make an additional gift: Sort your file by the “Additional Gift” column, largest to smallest. Note the number of people with additional gift amounts greater than zero, and divide that number by the total number of participants.  Multiply by 100 and you have your percentage of participants who make an additional gift.
  • Percent of Team Participants: Sort your file by the “Team Name” column, largest to smallest. Note the number of people with a Team Name present in this field, and divide that number by the total number of participants.  Multiply by 100 and you have your percentage of participants who register as part of a team.

Viola! Now you can start to understand of how engaged your participants and fundraisers are.  You can continue to slice and dice your data as desired to understand who your key fundraisers are – team members vs. individuals, age range, gender, zip code, etc.  You can also create a daily or weekly chart of participation and fundraising activity to watch your progress over time, or compare from year to year.  Using this data, consider whether you are on the appropriate path with your communications, or whether you need to adjust your messaging or frequency of messages.

 

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