Let's Talk Facebook and Events | npENGAGE

Let’s Talk Facebook and Events

By on Oct 1, 2010

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Facebook is the most popular social media platform. Individuals are spending 700 billion minutes; yes that’s a B, 700 billion minutes on Facebook each month. How can your organization capitalize on Facebook’s reach? If you missed last week’s webinar on social media and events, no worries here are some ideas Jonathan at Charity Dynamics and I shared.

Make use of tabs. Create an event hub.

  • Keep it simple, informative and engaging.
  • Include the dates, locations, and promotions for your event.
  • Include key information for participating.
  • Include your mission information to inspire and motivate constituents to participate.
  • Include the link to register online!

Keep the buzz alive.

  • Share information through updates (We just reached 1,000 participants!, we’ve just hit $50,000 in fundraising!, etc.), RSS feeds from an external site, photos, news stories.
  • Ask questions of your fans, take polls—get the conversations flowing in your hub and across your participants’ networks.
  • Update your event hub and direct individuals there for all the latest event details.

Extend the invitations!

  • The biggest social network boon is the ability to tap into your constituents’ networks.  So make sure you invite them to join you!
  • Publicize your social network hub on email, websites and offline promotions.
  • Let your constituents know what connections, tools and information are available—and ask them to involve their networks.

Talk amongst yourselves.

  • Remember- when your fans “like”, comment on, or share your posts, it is broadcast to their networks of friends on Facebook.
  • Encourage conversations among your fans—the more chatter, the bigger the reach.  Consider asking questions, posting polls, soliciting ideas.
  • Ask your fans to post information about your event in their status updates—one click by them and your event is broadcast to their entire network.
  • At minimum be prepared to monitor comments, respond to questions and participate.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Amy Braiterman, principal strategy consultant at Blackbaud, supports customers with their peer-to-peer fundraising events with a process she refers to as “data-driven strategy.” Amy’s data driven strategy analyzes how effective event participants are using online fundraising tools and takes those results to develop an event fundraising plan. Prior to joining Blackbaud, Amy earned her fundraising stripes managing events for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Alzheimer’s Association and Share Our Strength. She shares her fundraising know how here on npENGAGE, by hosting educational webinars and speaking at customer conferences

Comments (8)

  • Hi Amy,

    I love this new blog! I have a quick question for you. Can you explain what the “one click” is in this pointer? “Ask your fans to post information about your event in their status updates—one click by them and your event is broadcast to their entire network.”

    I have been toying around with auto populating status updates, but have been unable to find a reliable solution. Thanks!

    Shana Masterson
    Lead Manager, Online Campaigns
    National Brain Tumor Society
    Twitter: @npshana

    • Hi Shana,

      I’m so glad to hear that you like the blog! Thanks for your question. The one click refers to the “Share” button under posts. Encourage your participants to share your status updates with their network. Their friends might want to sign up for in your event or learn more about the cause and organization. I’m a big fan of the “Share” button, it’s just a great way to spread the word.

      Facebook is great because it’s a one click world. It’s so easy for participants to update their network with what they’re up to and what their interested in. It provides participants with another outlet to use when fundraising. It serves as a reminder for those who received their email donation ask and extends their reach to those individual not in their address book. One of my favorite participant tools in Friends Asking Friends is the ability for participants to update their facebook status or send tweets right from their fundraising HQ. While they are in their Fundraising HQ sending emails to potential donors they can also update their social media network.

      I don’t know much about auto populating status updates. Are you thinking about participant’s status updates?

      thanks! Amy 🙂

  • Amy Braiterman says:

    Hi Shana,
    I’m so glad to hear that you like the blog! Thanks for your question. The one click refers to the “Share” button under posts. Encourage your participants to share your status updates with their network. Their friends might want to sign up for in your event or learn more about the cause and organization. I’m a big fan of the “Share” button, it’s just a great way to spread the word.
    Facebook is great because it’s a one click world. It’s so easy for participants to update their network with what they’re up to and what their interested in. It provides participants with another outlet to use when fundraising. It serves as a reminder for those who received their email donation ask and extends their reach to those individual not in their address book. One of my favorite participant tools in Friends Asking Friends is the ability for participants to update their facebook status or send tweets right from their fundraising HQ. While they are in their Fundraising HQ sending emails to potential donors they can also update their social media network.
    I don’t know much about auto populating status updates. Are you thinking about participant’s status updates?
    thanks! Amy

  • Do you suggest keeping the guest list of who's attending/not attending/maybe's private (only seen by admins and not everyone) ?

    Do you know of any way to export the guest list from a Facebook event to an excel file for example so we can communicate with those who said they were attending – to remind them they need to register on our site, etc. ?

    • Amy Braiterman says:

      Hi Julie,

      Thanks for your question. It was great meeting you briefly at BBCon. I've often found more people show up to an event advertised on Facebook than those who actually RSVP. I'm not sure if it's really the best tool to manage a guest list and I don't believe you can export the guest list from Facebook.

      On your Facebook event page, I would add clear instructions and a link directing visitors to your website to sign up for an event. Facebook is a great way to reach new people and direct them to your website to learn more about the cause and the work you do.

      The great thing about social networks is that they're open to everyone. So, if you decide to have individuals RSVP on facebook I would keep it public to help foster camaraderie and build excitement for your event. The cool thing about event pages, is you can update them to keep everyone in the Facebook world informed about what's going on with the event. In addition to your updates, event-goers can post comments and share their excitement with your online network.

      I hope this helps. Thanks for your question and for checking out my blog!

  • Melissa says:

    My organization has one Facebook Page for all of our state – do you find that “fans” are more engaged if it encompasses a larger unit – or if they are centered to their specific city, area, etc?

    • Amy Braiterman says:

      Hi Melissa,

      Thank you for your question!  I think it’s probably easier to have one facebook page for your state, it allows participants to feel like they’re apart of something larger than one event.  Plus managing multiple sites, is time consuming.  I’m a fan of building one large presence.

      If you’re trying to increase participant’s activity or engagement with you on Facebook than I would create posts that give your participants something to do.  When creating Facebook updates, ask yourself “would someone share this?”  “is someone able to comment on this?”

      I often see Facebook pages full of updates with no activity.  The goal of Facebook pages should be “engagement” giving participants an outlet to share thoughts, ideas or to simiply share something they found interesting.

      I hope this helps.  

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